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Benefits Of Working From Home Ict



Since then, the workplace has undergone a seismic shift. Global lockdowns forced all but essential workers to adopt remote work almost overnight. People scrambled to set up home offices and adjust to back-to-back virtual meetings and online collaboration.




benefits of working from home ict


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Some remote jobs may also come with flexible hours, which allow you even more control over when you get your work done in addition to where. This depends on your job and employer, but for me, WFH means I can take an hour or two away from my computer to go to the dentist or pop to the store during business hours. When my kids were younger, WFH meant I could make school events without much scheduling fuss, or easily pick up a sick kid from school with just a quick message to my boss.


Many people with disabilities, such as chronic back pain or mental illness, can also benefit from WFH gear and settings personalized to meet their needs. An employee with chronic joint pain, for example, may feel more comfortable in their ergonomic home desk chair. A worker with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), can position their desk near a window to get more sunlight. Someone who moves or fidgets often through the day can do so without worrying about distracting others.


With no commute, you contribute fewer greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere. At home, you can have more control over the environmental impact of your office. Turn off most of the lights in your home, use surge protectors, and set your office equipment to power-save mode. There are also federal and state incentives to improve the energy efficiency of your home.


The boundaries between your job and your life can become blurred when you work from home. According to research from NordVPN Teams, remote employees in the U.S., the U.K., and Canada put in an average of two extra hours of work per day in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. As you may know firsthand, when work expands and seeps into your free time like this, it can throw off your work-life balance and accelerate burnout.


Teleworking is not a new idea. In the past, it was a luxury afforded to a lucky few. But its widespread adoption due to the pandemic became a benefit of the modern job. Many companies already had long-term goals to set up remote work environments, but the pandemic accelerated the process.


Some organizations settled into a work-from-home routine quickly. For others, it took time as they set up systems to enable remote work. Once organizations worked out the kinks, they found this new way of working had some benefits.


A frequent complaint in today's world is the difficulty of striking a good work-life balance. Working eight or more hours a day leaves little time for family -- especially when commutes and sleep are factored in. Working from home eliminates lengthy commutes, enabling more time with loved ones. And on days when employees aren't required to attend video meetings, they can dress any way they choose -- including pajamas. This greater sense of comfort and better work-life balance lead to less stress.


Remote workers reported stable or increased productivity while working remotely compared to in an office, according to a Great Place to Work report. During 2020, the steepest productivity improvements came in April and May, during the height of the pandemic. Much of this was due to the elimination of daily commutes and lengthy in-person meetings.


When working from home, many of the factors that cause tardiness are reduced or removed. Eliminated factors include oversleeping, being stuck in traffic and waiting in a long line at the drive-through to get morning coffee. Being able to roll out of bed and start working is a huge time saver.


Remote work means employees can work from anywhere -- not just their home. Coffee shops, beaches and other countries are now options. If asynchronous work is appropriate, organizations can even extend operations beyond a typical 9 to 5 workday. Flexible working hours can be a godsend to employees who are night owls, or to those who have small children. This freedom is invaluable for companies looking to stretch their working hours with a limited staff. It is also an attractive benefit that enables employers to draw from a deeper candidate pool in the hiring process.


Organizations scrambled to put the right tools in place to enable remote work when the pandemic began. Many companies were using outdated tools, forcing them to upgrade their systems. At the time, some businesses were already experimenting with telework and were better able to meet this challenge. But even they had difficulty scaling from a handful of employees with remote work privileges to an entire workforce.


There are many distractions at home that can detract from an employee's focus on their work. Some of these factors include screaming children, noise from passing traffic, ringing doorbells, dogs barking and household chores. If employees continue to work from home, it's important that they have a dedicated workspace, access to childcare and a schedule.


Remote work -- especially for those who live alone -- can lead to feelings of loneliness and isolation. Even if an employee has their own office in a physical office building, they see others in the hallway, elevator and parking lot throughout the day. They also interact with people at gas stations, coffee shops and restaurants during their commute to work and their lunch. Workers may only exchange pleasantries, but it is in-person social interaction. Employees who work from home miss out on these conversations.


Though a better work-life balance is sometimes an advantage, many teleworkers find the opposite to be true. Some employees find that work bleeds over into their home life more and more. It can start as something simple, such as responding to an email after clocking out for the day. But if workers aren't careful, that can turn into multiple emails or putting in extra work after hours. For some, this turns an eight-hour day into a 10-hour day or more. The line between work life and home life becomes blurred when the workplace is inside the home, which can lead to burnout and lower morale.


Security is always at the top of a business's list of priorities. But it becomes critical when an organization must accommodate remote working arrangements. A company's potential security loopholes increase when factoring in antivirus software, firewalls and VPN configurations for employees' home internet connections. Further complicating matters is when employees decide to work from a coffee shop or other location with public Wi-Fi, and when they bring personal devices onto a business network. Before the idea of remote work is even mentioned, businesses must be sure they can meet or exceed security expectations to minimize a cybersecurity disaster.


No one's internet connection is completely stable at every possible second. Electricity and internet outages aside, connections can vary in speed and reliability over the course of a day. For people in crowded areas where many others also work from home -- such as apartment complexes and densely packed cities -- slow speeds, buffering, and poor audio and video connections are common.


The problem is compounded by disparities in high-quality internet access throughout the country. Reliable internet service is still a commodity in rural areas. And home broadband access is generally less prevalent in Black and Hispanic residences compared to white residences, according to a PEW Research Center survey. Households reporting lower levels of education and income are also similarly restricted in terms of quality internet access.


Starting a new job is stressful for most people, even under the best of circumstances. But new hires to an organization might feel overwhelmed if they are going from a traditional office to one primary based at home. Not only do they have to learn how to perform in their new role, but they must also learn to navigate new technology. As a result, managers may spend more time coaching a new remote employee.


Telecommuting is the ability for an employee to complete work assignments from outside the traditional workplace by using telecommunications tools such as email, phone, chat and video apps. The pervasive growth of the Internet, along with advancements in unified communications (UC), artificial intelligence and robotics has made it easier than ever for many work-related tasks to be performed outside the normal workplace. Knowledge workers are especially well-suited for working from home or other remote locations. Jobs that require the physical operation of special equipment, including vehicles, are not well-suited for telecommuting.


Background: eHealth applications for out-of-hospital monitoring and treatment follow-up have been advocated for many years as a promising tool to improve treatment compliance, promote individualized care and obtain a person-centred care. Despite these benefits and a large number of promising projects, a major breakthrough in everyday care is generally still lacking. Inappropriate organization for eHealth technology, reluctance from users in the introduction of new working methods, and resistance to information and communication technology (ICT) in general could be reasons for this. Another reason may be attitudes towards the potential in out-of-hospital eHealth applications. It is therefore of interest to study the general opinions among healthcare professionals to ICT in healthcare, as well as the attitudes towards using ICT as a tool for patient monitoring and follow-up at home. One specific area of interest is in-home follow-up of elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The aim of this paper is to investigate the attitudes towards ICT, as well as distance monitoring and follow-up, among healthcare professionals working with this patient group.


Method: This paper covers an attitude survey study based on responses from 139 healthcare professionals working with CHF care in Swedish hospital departments, i.e. cardiology and medicine departments. Comparisons between physicians and nurses, and in some cases between genders, on attitudes towards ICT tools and follow-up at home were performed.


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